FROM THE FIELD, MOCHATERNS, Uncategorized

Mochatern Monday 09.19.16 : What is Africa like?

Whenever you travel or experience something new and different, your return home comes with the inevitable onslaught of questions. Boil all those questions down, and everyone is asking essentially the same thing: What was it like? What did life look like there?

This gets at a desire that many of us, especially here at Mocha Club, share: to experience the lives of people who are different from us. What is Africa like? We want to know.

What do you do on a Tuesday morning in urban Kenya? What does Friday night look like in rural Malawi? Is it immensely different from life in America? Is it similar? Whenever it’s me on the receiving end of questions like these, I fumble around for answers, remember we all like showing more than telling, and then stick my iPhone in front of my listeners. This is what driving down the road on a Saturday afternoon in rural Uganda looks like. Cows being herded down the highway. Driving on the left side instead of the right, with innumerable speed bumps when you’re passing through every village. That’s not a baby you hear crying at 0:11 seconds—it’s a goat bleating. Those are the Rwenzori mountains in the distance; you’re heading east. It looks like rain. Of course, this is only a tiny moment—one minute and one second, to be exact. But moments like this can be invaluable to us. We get to step out of our own selves and be someone else for that minute. And when we go back to our own selves, the ones holding a phone or sitting in front of a computer in the United States of America, we find that Africa isn’t so far away after all.

I NEED AFRICA, INSPIRATION, MOCHATERNS

Mochatern Monday 09.12.16: “Sit, sit and watch for a bit. Listen, listen a while before you speak.”

This summer, I went to a faraway place. The dirt covers your feet there, the mountains loom large and the children shout “mzungu!” (white person) as you pass. I went to Bundibugyo, a small town in rural western Uganda, and it did not leave me where it found me.

While in Bundibugyo, I learned to say about forty words in Lubwisi, the local language. I learned to say hello, goodbye, and thank you. I could say chicken, cow, and goat. I was a far cry from any sort of real conversation. I learned to buy chapati (a tortilla-flatbread-pancake sort of thing) from the lady chapati maker on the corner, though I too often forgot to greet her before placing my order. I learned my way around the market, through stalls of cabbage, tomatoes, fish, beans, and rice, always struggling to figure out how Ugandan shillings worked in my American-dollar brain. Though I was welcomed and loved by both the community I lived in and the organization I joined, as I drove eastward to the Entebbe airport on my way out of the country in late July, I knew I’d barely scraped the surface.

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I think this gets at one of the biggest things I realized, in those weeks in Uganda: the immense length of time it would take to really become a part of the community. You can’t simply pop over the Rwenzori Mountains from Fort Portal and start enchanting all the locals with your enthusiasm, your willingness to help, or your care for children or elderly people or pregnant women. No, it takes a bit more than that. Because even if you’ve got the Lubwisi down, you’ve got an accent too; and do you really know the culture yet? Do you know why western Uganda is the way it is? Do you fully appreciate all the nuances of life there? And let’s not forget you’re a Mzungu, a white person from a place very far away. Sit, sit and watch for a bit. Listen, listen a while before you speak.

This lesson is one that has served me well, even after returning to America, and into my internship here at Mocha Club. Much of the work that Mocha Club supports is done in places like Bundibugyo, places where joy and brokenness and sorrow and gladness live side by side. The Home Again Children’s Home, for instance, a ministry supported by Mocha Club that provides a home for over 70 children, is in Kaihura, Ugandaa town I drove right through on my journey back to America. These are places with need, but they are not places devoid of of histories, of traditions, of language, or of people who love them. The joy for us comes when we listen, when we wait, and when we join in the work that is already being done.

That’s the real privilege, isn’t it? Even here in the States, somewhere around 8,000 miles from a place like East Africa, we who are a part of the Mocha Club get to join in this work. We get to go to shows, contribute a few dollars a month, see photos, and hear stories of the work already begunwith, not for or around or in spite of, the people in places like Kenya, Ethiopia, and Uganda. We join in. And maybe that’s all way more humbling than we expectedbut oh, see how much better it all is, and watch how much we learn.

MOCHATERNS, Uncategorized

Welcome our new Mochatern, Kelly!

We are excited to welcome another new Mochatern for the Fall 2016 season, Kelly! She has traveled all the way from Harrisonburg, Virginia to hang out with us in Nashville for the season and we are looking forward to having her as part of our day-to-day Mocha Club team!

Name: Kelly OstergrenIMG_5040

Hometown: Pasadena, MD

University: James Madison University, 2013, English

Favorite Place: Anywhere in and around Harrisonburg, VA with a view of the mountains 

Walk up song: Switchfoot’s “Let It Out”

Nashville bucket list: Go on adventures/to concerts with my dear friend who lives here, find bookstores with used books (aka book thrifting), visit Jenni’s on more than one occasion

How I take my coffee: Unadulterated (aka black)

Guilty pleasure: Eating homemade just-out-of-the-oven bread with Irish butter

Why I’m excited about interning at Mocha: I love the way this organization sees aid as a partnership and that African leaders decide what is needed in their communities. Since my experience with nonprofits so far has been focused on the U.S., I look forward to working with an international organization. I love that I’ll have multiple roles and get to be a part of many different projects. I’ve had a great experience meeting staff so far and am thrilled to get to work alongside them!

ARTISTS, EVENTS, Uncategorized, Women at Risk

Volunteer with Mocha Club & Matt Wertz!

IMG_5103Mocha Club is heading out on the #GUNSHY tour with Matt Wertz this Fall! And we are looking for volunteers to help out at each show. Help support our friends in Africa by volunteering at the Mocha Club table!

We need 2 people to work the Mocha Club table and Matt’s merch table at each of the concerts listed below.  Would you be available? It will be a fun night sharing about Mocha Club and welcoming new people into our community. We can’t do this without you!

A fun bonus is that Mocha Club table staff get free admission to the concert!


GUNSHY FALL 2016 TOUR

September 14: Bryan, TX // VOLUNTEER!

September 15 : Austin, TX // VOLUNTEER!

September 16 : Dallas, TX // VOLUNTEER!

September 17 : Waco, TX // VOLUNTEER!

September 18 : Houston, TX // VOLUNTEER!

September 20: Phoenix, AZ // VOLUNTEER!

September 23 : Hollywood, CA // VOLUNTEER!

September 27 : San Francisco, CA // VOLUNTEER!

September 29 : Portland, OR // VOLUNTEER!

September 30 : Seattle, WA // VOLUNTEER!

October 4: Salt Lake City, UT // VOLUNTEER!

October 6 : Denver, CO // VOLUNTEER!

October 8 : Lawrence, KS // VOLUNTEER!

October 9 : St. Louis, MO // VOLUNTEER!

October 19 : Orlando, FL // VOLUNTEER!

October 21: Charlotte, NC // VOLUNTEER!

October 23 : Charlottesville, VA // VOLUNTEER!

October 26 : Washington D.C. // VOLUNTEER!

October 27 : Allston, MA // VOLUNTEER!

October 28: New York City, NY // VOLUNTEER!

October 30 : Philadelphia, PA // VOLUNTEER!

November 10 : Ferndale, MI // VOLUNTEER!

November 11 : Grand Rapids, MI // VOLUNTEER!

November 12 : Chicago, IL // VOLUNTEER!

November 13: Minneapolis, MN // VOLUNTEER!

November 15 : Madison, WI // VOLUNTEER!

November 16 : Indianapolis, IN // VOLUNTEER!

November 17 : Louisville, KY // VOLUNTEER!

December 2 : Atlanta, GA // VOLUNTEER!

December 3 : Birmingham, AL // VOLUNTEER!


We’re looking for people who are…

  • Friendly, passionate, responsible, & organized
  • Able to take initiative in introducing Mocha Club to people
  • At least 18 years old

What Mocha Club table staff will need to do at the concert:

  • Arrive approximately 1 hour before the show to set up the Mocha Club table (instructions will be provided).
  • Explain Mocha Club to people who approach the table before, during, and after the event.
  • Be responsible for Mocha Club table items throughout the show (do not leave table unattended).
  • After concert, answer questions and help people fill out Mocha Club signup form.
  • Safely pack up all items at the end of the show and make sure completed signup forms are Fedex’d to us **no later than the next business day following the concert.**
Education, FROM THE FIELD

Happy Graduation, Denish!

Denish was a promising student in his primary school – receiving high marks and passing all his exams.  The next step should seem simple but for many children in Nairobi, Kenya, the journey ends here.

Denish is one of 9 siblings and for his father, this is quite a household to keep up financially.  Even working in the neardenishby Runda estate of Nairobi does not provide enough, and in this case, not enough for school.  When Denish heard of his passing scores from primary school, he was so excited to share the good news with his family. Unfortunately, the good news fell short when Denish’s father shared that he could not afford the school fees to send his son to school the next year. Denish wept.

The only thing that his father could offer him was encouragement to pray to God and trust that His will be done.

The next school year came and as Denish joined his dad in the labor business, he watched his fellow students from the previous year walk to high school in their new uniforms. Denish felt sad and jealous. But one day he saw something else: bright yellow school uniforms to another high school in the area.  He asked his dad to inquire about this other school and his dad didn’t hesitate.  The following morning, Denish’s dad walked into the office at New Dawn Educational Centre and shared his son’s passing test scores. The staff was impressed and admission for Denish was granted!

Thanks to New Dawn and it’s partners like Mocha Club, Denish was not only able to open space for him to learn but the financial means to take care of his fees.

Today Denish has graduated high school and looks forward to the opportunity to further his education at the university.

“When Jesus say yes, nobody can say no. To this far I have reached, I’ll never be a shamed to say that its all about God, and Glory to Him in the highest.”

MOCHATERNS, Uncategorized

Welcome our new Mochatern, Lindsey!

We are excited to welcome our new Mochatern for the Fall 2016 season, Lindsey! She was part of the group from Belmont University who partnered with Mocha Club to host a screening of the Poverty, Inc. film on NGOs & foreign aid. We are looking forward to having her as part of our day-to-day Mocha Club team!

Hometown: New York, NYIMG_5041

Belmont University, Junior English major

Favorite place: Climb Nashville. And Portland Brew!

Walk up song? Hymns; any of them.

Nashville bucket list: find decent ethnic foods in this town. Current goals: Ethiopian, Indian, Ramen, and Korean. Any recommendations appreciated!

How do you take your mocha [coffee]? I don’t, actually! But give me tea, no milk no sugar, any day.

Guilty pleasure? Taylor Swift.

Why are you excited about interning with Mocha Club? Excited to see the inner workings and thought behind an Africa-focused nonprofit that I’ve respected for so long!

FROM THE FIELD, Women at Risk

Women at Risk: Healing From the Inside Out

When thinking about organizations in Africa, you may be thinking, “How are people selected to be in these programs?”

The process of selecting women to be apart of the Women at Risk program is not a quick or easy process. The women are chosen based on their desire to leave the prostitution industry and their desire to leave it in the past. Here is a closer look into the process of how women’s lives are being changed.

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First, social workers visit the women on the streets and in bars during the night, hoping to talk to them and build relationships with them. During the night visits, the social workers look for women who are desiring to leave prostitution and find a way out.

The beautiful thing about this is that the women are met right where they are. In the streets. In the bars. Just as they are. 

The social workers get to know them right where they are and invite them to come to the center for more relationship building. Finally, if the desire to get out of prostitution is authentic, they are invited for a final interview.

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Next, twenty women are accepted into the program and begin structured counseling. Many of the women receive one-on-one counseling to make their rehabilitation a success!

During this counseling, the women are loved on and cared for not just physically, but mentally and spiritually.

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In the final phase of the program, skills training, the women choose a skill to pursue and grow in. Trades include designing and tailoring, food preparation, and hair styling. Eight of the women also chose to start their own businesses and employ themselves. Training in finance was provided for these women, so they can learn the necessary skills to be successful.

One of the most impactful parts of this program is that during the rehabilitation process childcare is provided! In the Nazareth Project in Nazareth Town, Ethiopia, there are 54 children and mothers being cared for. Out of the 54 children, 11 of them are under the age of 4. The children receive day care and participate in a summer camp.

Without the help and care for the children, the mothers would not be capable of going through the full process of the Women at Risk program.

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Women at Risk is not only just for women, but it also helps children receive the loving care they need!

So when you participate in giving to The Mocha Club, you are not only helping women change their lives for the better, but you are helping families become whole again.

MOCHATERNS, Uncategorized

Mochatern Monday 08.08.16 : “Ubuntu”

Happy Monday, Mocha Club!

I created a painting (you guys will see the video, as well as the painting this week!) and I put the word “ubuntu” on it. It is a theory that comes from the South African region and it means “a quality that includes essential human virtues; compassion and humanity”. And I love it.  I researched it more and I found that in certain regions of South Africa, if someone does something wrong they are taken to the center of the village they live in and the tribe stands around the person in a circle for two days and they talk about all of the good things that person has done. Their belief is that each person is good and they will make mistakes sometimes. They believe that “unity and affirmation have more power to change behavior than shame and punishment.”, which is known as ubuntu.

 I mean how cool is that? That the people in their village make sure that person that messed up knows of all of the good things they have ever done and that through all the bad things, they are not going to “shame” or “punish” them for it, but yet be there for them and help them get through it. I believe that we all somehow have that. I mean, no one surrounds you for two days and talks about the good you’ve done, but we all get reassured of it somehow when we mess up from our friends and family. We know they are there for us through the good and the bad. I think that is pretty awesome.

Peace and blessings,

Katherine

source: http://www.susiehayesnow.com/ubuntu/

#mcjourney2016, Economic Freedom, FROM THE FIELD, Women at Risk

“I know the best is yet to come this is just the beginning.”

Geni has attended the counseling program at Women at Risk and completed it after five months. Currently, she has moved on to the skills program & is using her talents & new-learned skills to move forward to economic freedom.

dresses

Geni chose to take training in tailoring at the center for three months and has shown very good performance in her work. She started sewing different cloths in different styles to sell. Her friends and other people around her in the project encouraged her by buying her products. Fortunately, everyone liked her products and Women at Risk decided to buy her a sewing machine so that she can start a small scale sewing business in order to generate income by her own!

Geni has started her small business in a rental house and is doing well! She has already started saving money. Moreover, Geni’s child moved on to grad one in school with good grades and she is very happy about it.

Geni said “I know the best is yet to come this is just the beginning”. She thanks Ellilta Women At Risk and YOU for renewing her hope.

Support women like Geni

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