All Posts By

Mocha Club

AFRICA NEWS, Clean Water, FROM THE FIELD, I NEED AFRICA, INSPIRATION, Uncategorized

Your mochas can become clean water.

Mocha Club’s community leader writes… Mvera is home to 300 villages in central Malawi. It is pretty difficult to get water in this area — because it is a hilly area full of rocks, the water springs dry out during the dry season and boreholes are hard to drill. There are two wells: one that functions and one that doesn’t and has been broken for years. So the 300 villages in Mvera all rely on this one functioning well — including those who live 3+ miles away from it. 

Mvera is also home to one of Mocha Club’s local community development classes. As the class spent time out in the community, listening to friends, neighbors, and local stakeholders, the gravity of the water situation became very clear — Lack of clean water is something that affects everything and everyone in the community.

Women and girls are often the ones forced to spend their days going back and forth to the one working well; women even keep mats at the well so they can rest while they wait in the long lines and the young girls miss school classes in order to help their families retrieve water.

The students in the community development class found that the local hospital was having a hard time keeping up with the rate of water-borne illnesses. It has even had to push expectant mothers out of the hospital because there is no water. In addition, new businesses don’t want to set up shop in a town without water either.

So the class went to work. They talked to local engineers, parts suppliers, professional builders and plumbers to get suggestions, cost estimates, and timelines. Fixing the old well — which they found out was dug in 1922, originally to 36 meters deep — was time consuming and expensive as it had gotten so full of sand and mud over the past 95 years that it now went only 7 meters deep. So they went back to work, consulting more members of the community and water experts. Turns out they had local resources to complete a piping project that would take water from the functioning well to a new purification tank further out and then, once treated, from the tank through smaller pipes to a distribution area easily accessible by 5,000 people.

They put together a proposal which included a plan for strategically piping water and purifying it for those communities in need. The proposal includes how they would utilize local resources and also the opportunity for funding to make this project become a reality and sent the proposal to Mocha Club’s local Country Director. It went through a few rounds of vetting — ensuring the project was feasible, practical, locally sustainable — now it is time to act.

Here’s where you come in — your mochas can become 5dffe47c3570533b449d773d_372x560Mvera’s clean water. Your everyday generosity, together with the rest of the Mocha Club community, will be the reason 5,000 have safe drinking water, a functioning hospital, fuller schools, and new economic opportunities. And it will be the reason the next community, and the next community, and the next community after Mvera get clean water.

Mocha Club Members, THANK YOU!

 

Not a member yet? Want to help provide clean water to Mvera and other communities? Will you give up a few extra mochas this World Water Day?

Join today and we’ll send you a Mocha Club water bottle as a thank you!


 

#mcjourney2016, #mcjourney2017, AFRICA TRIPS, FROM THE FIELD, I NEED AFRICA, PERSPECTIVES

“Go. Go and see the power of a mocha.”

Have you ever thought about how the places you live and work and enjoy were once just an idea in someone’s head? Think about your school, your home, your favorite coffeeshop. They all began with a dream; a hope to support the life and joy of your community. 

During MC Journey 2016, this awareness transformed our 12-day trip into a deeply meaningful experience.  Each and every place we visited held a special memory — chatting with students and teachers at New Dawn, dancing with the women at HEKO while rain fell around our shelter, sitting on the sunlit porch at the Women at Risk recalling the darkness of the drive we took the night before — but more than anything, I loved hearing stories of how and why it all began. 

73EDA7AC-3C77-412D-BE21-9331C1B251FF@localdomain

Before our visit to each organization, we sat across the table from their founders as they graciously shared their personal journey leading to the realization of a need in their community.  We had the privilege of hearing how places like New Dawn, HEKO, and Women and Risk were once dreams, turned into reality, and sustained by the support of every Mocha Club member.  Can you imagine walking into a place for the very first time with that understanding of its history? 

The hardest work you will do on your MC Journey will be to let go of your expectations and be fully present during every conversation, every story, every offer of service given to you.  You will most certainly do more listening than labor.  You will come to find that you are there not to serve, but be served.  You will so clearly see how one cup of coffee supports African leaders with a vision for loving their community.  You will see how one cup plants hope in many who felt hopeless, and how another empowers them to live independently in health and financial stability.  But most importantly, you will be filled to the brim with a joy so moving I can hardly put it into words. Go. Go and see the power of a mocha.

#mcjourney2017, AFRICA TRIPS, Clean Water, Education, FROM THE FIELD, HIV/AIDS + Healthcare, Orphan Care, Women at Risk

Announcing: Mocha Club Journey 2017 !

Artboard 2 copy 3

Screen Shot 2017-02-03 at 9.26.45 AM

Has it been life-long dream to travel to Africa? Do you have a heart to serve others around the world? Do you love to meet new people and find friends with common interests?

If you answered YES to any of the above, join the Mocha Club Journey 2017 trip to Africa this summer!


This summer we are headed to Ethiopia and Kenya!  We will spend time with our partners at Women at Risk in both the capital city of Addis Ababa, and in Nazareth, a town a few hours outside of the city. We will also visit New Dawn Educational Centre and Heritage Kenya Organization (HEKO) in Nairobi, Kenya. Our trips provide an opportunity for Mocha Club members and their friends to visit Africa and witness firsthand what giving up a few mochas a month can do, while having a chance to serve the African people. The trip will be 12 days long and we team up with the local indigenous leaders in each country to serve alongside them in the orphanages, schools, and other various projects that Mocha Club supports.

  • Dates: June 11- June 22, 2017 (dates could vary 1-2 days on each side, depending on flight availability)
  • Cost: $4,000
  • Trip Details: Click here!
  • Interested? Email trips(at)themochaclub.org. We will follow up with details! But don’t wait too long… space is limited! 

<< APPLY TODAY>>

(or download the application & mail in):

Mocha Club
P.O. Box 2888
Brentwood, TN 37024-2888


Meet Your Trip Leaders:

IMG_0112  Curtis Stoneberger has been a long-time friend of Mocha Club and currently stands as the Executive Vice President of the organization. His first trip to Africa was a visit to the Democratic Republic of the Congo with Mocha Club Artist, Sidewalk Prophets. He enjoys rides on his motorcycle, family time at his cabin, and music.

 

Fallon Mocha Club Trip Leader  Fallon officially joined the Mocha Club team in Nashville in early 2013, but has   been a long-time member and supporter.  As the Mocha Club Artist & Member Care Manager, she’ll make sure your trip to Africa is just one of the many ways you stay connected to the club! Fallon loves dancing, her puppy Henry, and leftovers.

Education, EVENTS, FROM THE FIELD

Happy New {School} Year!

If you’ve supported our education initiatives through Mocha Club or have ever participated in Ellie’s Run for Africa , you supported students at New Dawn Academy who have now graduated! With joy of new students starting school, there is also joy celebrating the students that are moving on to bigger things!

Screen Shot 2016-01-06 at 1.47.57 PM

The lead up to graduation starts with final exams. In previous years, the students would take their exams at the school per normal but this year they were advised by the government and department of education to take the exams at a nearby teacher’s college. Transportation in Kenya is not as accessible as that in the States and so with the help of supportive parents, the students traveled to take their exams together:

“The parents chipped in and supported towards the transportation of students to and from the exam venue. They hired a bus that made it easier for the entire exercise to be concluded with minimal hitches. This required special/extra arrangements for the transport and meals. The candidates’ parents agreed to take up the cost for hiring transport to and from the exam venues. The school provided lunch for the candidates.” 

Screen Shot 2016-01-06 at 1.48.14 PM

And then came the big day!

Screen Shot 2016-01-06 at 1.48.30 PM

“Several students gave short remarks regarding their experience at NDEC, all in appreciation of the opportunity to have been part of the family. The teachers too appreciated their time of interaction with the students and encouraged them to pursue opportunities to further their education and career objectives with the assurance that God would be with them all the way into the future.”

The staff at New Dawn wanted to gives thanks for the support of all who participated in Ellie’s Run and the donors from Mocha Club! These students couldn’t have done what they did without you.

Thank you!

INSPIRATION, MOCHATERNS, PERSPECTIVES, Uncategorized

Mochatern Monday 12.19.16 : Fare Thee Well

It’s been almost 4 months since I tried to enter the back door of Mocha Club and eventually found the front door of our lovely office. I drove 8 hours the day before from Virginia and all of my belongings for the next 4 months still filled my car. I walked into the office and began. As it often does, the time rushed past and now I have about a week left in Nashville. As I think back on these months spent in the South, I consider what I learned.

I learned a lot of things, but the most important one that will affect my work and life is about how to relate to other people. I deeply respect the way that Mocha Club staff members operate by working closely with African leaders. They make these leaders’ dreams their own and work with them toward their goals with a posture of humility and respect. I could go on about the many other things I learned through being here day to day, or talk about how every person at the office showed me kindness and included me, but that might make for a long post. So I’ll stop here and just say that as I pack my bags, I will be taking more with me than when I came—things that I cannot pack in my car, lessons that will stay with me all of my life.

I’ll leave you with a poem I wrote based on a quote by one of our partners in Africa. May you be blessed and spread the blessing.

 

But Then

“The name of that place is actually Tumbe . . ., which means a place for rejected people, but God spoke to us and told us these people are not rejected, they should not be called rejected, they should not live with the name of rejection, so we said we are going to call this place Blessed Camp.” –Peter O O’chiel (Action Ministry)

The first word of the first Psalm

In my English Bible reads “blessed.”

A foundation of identity, something I

Have always been without knowing.

Ignorance is hard to shake

But it is not the kind of knowledge we

Think we need that will save us.

We think we are damned—

And we’re right, sort of.

We think we are unworthy—

And there is a hint of reality in that bitter delusion.

We think we are rejected—

And we could not be further (and nearer) to the truth.

We are only these things before.

We are only these things without.

We are only these things outside.

But then Love.

MOCHATERNS, PERSPECTIVES

Mochatern Monday 12.05.16: So why the Mocha Club?

 

I’ve asked this question to a number of my colleagues here at Mocha since beginning my internship three months ago. What brought you to this organization? Why this nonprofit, rather than another? Why work at a nonprofit at all? I’ve phrased the question in different ways each time, but really there’s one thing I want to know: tell me, how passionate are you about what you do? How invested are you in Mocha’s vision? screen-shot-2016-11-30-at-1-38-10-pm

If you’re anything like me, you tend to approach nonprofits with a critical eye. There are many pitfalls that go along with aid work in developing countries, particularly when that work is cross-cultural in nature. (I’ll point you, not for the first time, to books like When Helping Hurts and documentaries such as Poverty, Inc because they’ve been so helpful to me in understanding such challenges.) Doing work that is truly good, helpful, and sustainable is never easy. So when I think about the initiatives I want to support, both financially and with my time, I tend to start with a bit of cynicism, and I ask a lot of questions.

An internship is, by nature, rather like just skimming the surface of an organization. So during my time here at the Mocha Club, I’ve tried to ask questions, to dive deeper. I keep asking: why are you here? Why work at a place like the Mocha Club? 

screen-shot-2016-11-30-at-1-39-21-pmAnd you know what? My coworkers really believe in the work that the Mocha Club is doing. They keep looking back at me with excited eyes and telling me about what they love most. One talks about Mocha Club’s work with our artist partners, and how beautiful it is to work hand-in-hand and face-to-face with artists to unite their musical pursuits with the opportunity to support a good cause. Some talk about how the transparency of the organization makes it easy to see where your donations go; others speak on how much they believe in the value of the pastor training, orphan care, and the other projects that Mocha Club supports in Africa. I’ve had many conversations about the challenges of working cross-culturally—with, not for, the poor—and more than one coworker has voiced the importance of listening and of humility.

Forgive me if this all sounds like a pitch. Because here’s the thing: my internship with this lovely group of people is about to conclude—in fact, this is my last post on this blog. And this is what I’d love to leave you with. Believe in the good heart, the effectiveness, and the humility of the work that Mocha Club is doing in Africa. Believe in the people that send you emails, invite you to support new initiatives, and answer the phone when you call the office. When you join the Club, you’re joining a pretty special thing.

Uncategorized

Mochatern Monday 11.21.16 : Through the Back Door

Much of what I have learned recently came through reading books: a history book, how-to books on qualitative research, that one economics book, books on how the spiritual intersects with caring for others. And then there are all the words I’ve gratefully received from the people around me that work in the nongovernmental (NGO) sector. However, just because I’ve learned a lot doesn’t mean my application is on point.

In my first blog here, I wrote about learning that we ought to work “with” and not “for” the poor. In the world of education, it is easy to say, “Got it! I passed that test. I know that information. Let’s move on.” But good learning is so much more than that. These foundational pieces are meant to be built upon, not disappear. They are so important that we might have to check every once in a while and make sure the foundation isn’t cracking.

I considered sharing a poem I wrote recently called “Envision a Heard World.” In it, I basically critique the position that advocates for material things to be sent to those who need them, instead of also acknowledging their nonmaterial needs. I say that dignity never arrives in a box. So far so good. At the end of the poem, I wrote: “Please do not be deaf, too. / Hear our voices, / Close your eyes of self-determined vision / And hear our need to be heard.”

When I wrote this and read through it again the first few times, I saw nothing wrong with it. This time, though, I realized that I used my voice to cloud the voices of those who want to speak for themselves. Not good. In fact, that goes against everything I want to do and achieve. There is a time to advocate or speak on behalf of someone when you are acting as a mediator, but this is not an appropriate way of doing that.

One of the important things I learned in creative writing classes in college is that form needs to match function. If you are trying to say something, use a format that works with the point you are trying to make. I broke this rule when I used quotations in this poem, inserting my own power over the voices of those I did not even speak to. Those words were never said outside of my head. If I appeal to my audience in my own voice on behalf of others, perhaps that could be done in a way that does not trample on their own words.

So this is my confession. I am still learning and always will be. But I hope the cracks in my foundation are being filled with good cement so that I can build and advocate in a way that reflects the people I’m trying to love. This is also my warning, a little piece of advice to myself and others: don’t let words like this slip in through the back door of your mind and out of your mouth or onto a page. Yes, speak for yourself. And speak with others and sometimes about their stories when appropriate. But do not speak for them. They are capable of that. And if they need a megaphone, maybe your role is just to hand it to them without saying a word.

 

Uncategorized

Mochatern Monday 11.14.16 : Good Work

There are a lot of people rejoicing today and a lot of people in pain. Two presidential candidates were up for election; the result was, for many, an unexpected one. Many rejoice, many are in tears, and perhaps all are overwhelmingly disillusioned by a campaign season that was paved with hatred and discord. So while America can’t seem to agree on much, perhaps we can all agree on the importance of this question: is there a way for us to be less divided?img_6056

There are many things we may never agree on—and really, what a blessing to have the freedom to disagree. But I’m glad to be sitting at a desk at the Mocha Club office this morning, because it’s reminding me that there are so, so many things we can agree on. Orphan care is important; education is vital. Extending a hand to friends, both near and far, is beautiful. The way Mocha Club enables us to hear the stories and know the hearts of people in countries very far away: that’s special. There is work to be done, and we have the power to join in that work, with our attention, our volunteering, and our monthly donations, even the smallest of them.

Many of our friends in African countries do not have the luxury of peace amid changes in political power. For some of them, one-party governments often resemble dictatorships, elections come with rumors of rigging, and changes in power are accompanied by violence. No matter your views on last week’s results, let’s rejoice in a transfer of power that is peaceful, and let’s focus our energies on the good work still left for us to do.

 

INSPIRATION, MOCHATERNS, PERSPECTIVES, Uncategorized

I Want You . . . To Care About Economics

Economics is not my thing, not my strong point, quite frankly not my delight. Among all the subjects I studied in school, that one fit least well into the mold of my particular brain. I struggled to grasp the concepts presented during the last semester of my senior year of high school. I never took an Econ class in college, but I cracked open a book the other day and all things economics tumbled out: statistics and terms that I don’t use on a regular basis in my own financial context. Although I struggled to make sense of what the author conveyed at times,, I ultimately came away from the book as a grateful reader. Hang with me through the next few paragraphs and I’ll explain why.

Dambisa Moya wrote this book, titled Dead Aid: Why Aid is Not Working and How There is a Better Way for Africa, because she tired of seeing her native continent inundated in money that brought harm rather than betterment. (To clarify, the aid she mentions has little to do with international nongovernmental organizational (INGO) work. She refers to governments (generally Western) dumping funds on African governments.) Even if you’re not a “numbers person” this statistic might shock you: “Since the 1940s, approximately US$1 trillion of aid has been transferred from rich countries to Africa. This is nearly US$1,000 for every man, woman and child on the planet today” (pg 35). That’s 1,000,000,000,000 dollars. Twelve zeros. Wow.

Moya explains the situation by giving a brief history of aid and then explaining why aid has not achieved the goals it set out to accomplish. In a section titled “The vicious cycle of aid,” she enlightens the reader about how this happens:

Foreign aid props up corrupt governments – providing them with freely usable cash. These corrupt governments interfere with the rule of law, the establishment of transparent civil institutions and the protection of civil liberties, making both domestic and foreign investment in poor countries unattractive. Greater opacity and fewer investments reduce economic growth, which leads to fewer job opportunities and increasing poverty levels. In response to growing poverty, donors give more aid, which continues the downward spiral of poverty (pg 49).

Whew! If you’re anything like me, this sounds a little overwhelming. Thankfully, Moya doesn’t stop here. She gives more details about this corruption and its relationship to aid. Then she turns to providing alternatives for African countries: issuing bonds, finding investors, obtaining a credit rating, borrowing from institutions other than the World Bank in part to build credibility, and trading with other countries inside and outside the African continent. Moya spends a good amount of pages on current Chinese investment in Africa (which I found to be very interesting).

Ultimately, her recommendation is to cut out aid incrementally over a five year period until a country no longer receives any. She says that the general population of Africa won’t suffer as much as the reader might think because so much of the aid money is going to a small number of powerful people in African government positions anyway. If donor countries cut aid, African governments will be forced to stand on their own two feet and find ways to replace that money through the suggestions listed above.

Why am I telling you all of this? Well, you’re reading this on Mocha Club’s blog, so chances are that you care about Africa and its people. If you truly care about something, you generally invest time, money, or some other element of life into it. I’m not about to suggest that we all need to be economic scholars in order to care about Africa. But what I am suggesting is that education is important. If you care about something and want to see change, educate yourself about that issue. Start by reading one news article per day or following organizations you care about on social media.

Even though I’m not a huge economics fan, this discipline is integral to international development, so it’s worth my time to invest in learning a little bit about it. Take the plunge, friends: Pick up that book, scroll through that article, ask a friend about their life experience. You never know; economics might just be your thing.

INSPIRATION, MOCHATERNS

Better when we’re together.

storyhouse-jpg

82 degrees. It’s fall in Nashville, and the leaves are letting go and falling to be crunched under our boots, but the temperature doesn’t know it yet. We’re fine with that, though, because today we’re putting on a house show, and we’ll trade cold fingers and toes for a light breeze.

We arrive at 4:30; doors won’t open until 6:30. We spread twinkle lights around the back porch, spread a rug, and call it a stage. The sound guys arrive at 5, with a minivan full of equipment. We set up borrowed tables, spread someone else’s tablecloths, put out the snacks we bought at Kroger last night, hoping-praying we’d be reimbursed soon. We spread blankets gathered from three different houses as the bands run through soundcheck. Friends and friends of friends begin to come in the back gate just as they’re finishing, and we turn on the collaborative Spotify playlist.

This is what being a college student in Nashville looks like: concerts in the backyards of our houses, nights where everything we need is borrowed. Everything pauses when the band starts to play. For a few hours we sit and listen, marveling at the talent of the friends who perform and the good hearts of the ones who welcome us in. And then the concert is over, we pack up all the things, and a few of us head to Cookout for milkshakes and french fries. Homework is ignored, but so much good work is done.

Nights like this remind me of something that I hope I’ll remember long after I graduate: sometimes, it only works if we all work together. And isn’t that half the fun? Isn’t it even better if the ground is covered in blankets you don’t own and the seven strands of string lights come from four different people? When the after-concert Cookout party consists of the bands, the photographer, the hosts, the ones who donated time and apple cider and the rug for the stage, and the friends who just came to support?

When we look at our lives, aren’t the sweetest moments the ones we worked for together?

Speaking of Nashville nights…Come to The Well at Green Hills on Friday, November 11 at 7pm to enjoy a night of stories and songs in support of Mocha Club, much like the night I just wrote about, and hear the artist pictured above + some more great songwriters & storytellers! 

https://www.facebook.com/chrisrenzemamusic/

http://www.randwalter.com

https://www.facebook.com/marsongs/?fref=ts